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Category: Quick & Dirty

Storage Boxes from Scrap – Quick & Dirty


Today I share with you a technique to make multi-compartment trays or even shadow boxes from scrap pieces. With a slight modification, you can also make single storage boxes in large numbers for all your shop organization needs. And if you go that extra mile, you can turn what starts out as a shop project into something beautiful, too!.

You can find more information on determining the sizes required below! If you found this video valuable please share it with as many people as you can find! Thanks for watching, and be Inspired!

How do dimension Storage Boxes

Two things determine the dimension of what storage boxes you can (and should) make. One is the size of your scrap pieces, the other is what you actually want to store in them.

There is no way to influence the size of your scrap pieces (or possibly new stock you might be willing to use). So let us look at how to get from the desired size of the compartment to the actual measurements of the pieces. I drew up this sketch. You need the three dimensions of the desired size (yellow) and the thickness of your stock.

Keep in mind that you can (and should) double and triple C as many times as your stock allows. Do not forget to add the kerf-width as well. You will need to true them up later anyway, so you might as well cut them up then.

dimensions for the storage boxes

How to easily get the measurements you need from the compartment size you want.

What are the limits?

The main limits to what you can make are your clamps and the size of stock you have on hand. The tray design should keep things stable enough for most purposes and sizes. If you want to go really big, I recommend using thicker stock than I did or glue the whole tray onto a board large enough.

If you use this technique to make your own storage boxes or trays, I would love if you took pictures and sent them to me. Thank you for stopping by! And as always, remember to be Inspired!

Improvised Thickness Sander – Quick & Dirty


In a project I was working on (the tintin rocket) I had to flatten some segmented rings. I ended up using the thickness sander method I am showing you here, using a spindle sander or a sanding drum. I hope you find it useful and share it with your friends! Enjoy, and remember to be Inspired!

Ways to improve your thickness sander further

One major problem with this kind of sanding is that it is easy to push the piece faster than the sanding drum can remove material. Forcing it can cause the sandpaper to overheat and clog up with sawdust, which will in turn make it even harder to remove material – and ruin the sanding sleeve quickly. It can also cause deflection by pushing the axis out of alignment, resulting in skewed pieces.

The best way to avoid both problems is to take it slow. If it requires force to push a piece through, back off. Turn the screw back a notch and try again. Taking 10 light passes will get you better results than 2 heavy ones, and in the end it will not take you that much more time.

And while we are talking sandpaper, here is a neat trick to clean used sandpaper to make it last longer, and it works for any kind of sanding implement as well.

 



What not to do

You probably noticed already that you should always put in pieces against the rotation of the drum. Otherwise, your thickness sander turns into a workpiece accellerator, which means you either get shot at by your tool or have to play fetch every time you let go of your workpiece.

The same applies if for some reason you get the idea to use your belt sander for this, which is something I would not recommend. Although it is probably possiblbe with the right amount of care and accuracy.

Want more Dirty quick?

Have a look at my other Quick & Dirty projects for more inspiration and simple ideas in the workshop.

Thanks for stopping by, and remember to be Inspired!

 

Air Blow Gun Holder – Quick & Dirty


An air blower gun paired with a compressor in your shop is a great way to remove dust and debris, be it from a workpiece or a workbench. But while the looped hoses that are available offer some advantages, mostly in terms of reach, tidyness is not one of them. Fix that with a simple holder that allows you to put the loops in their place. And on top of that this can be made from scraps and in very little time. Enjoy, and remember to be Inspired!

If you liked this video please share it with your friends! And if you enjoy what I do, please consider supporting me on Patreon!

Sandpaper Cleaner – Quick & Dirty


We have all been there – the sandpaper on one of our sanders looks still good, but it is clogged with sawdust to the extend that it won’t sand anymore. There are ways to get a little more use out of it before you need to change it, especially if you do this before it is all gummed up. And on top of that, this little trick uses up some of the plastic wrap that you might already have in your shop’s waste bin. Enjoy, share, and remember to be Inspired!.

Quick & Dirty Safety Board


Yet another Quick & Dirty project, this one is meant to solve one problem that I have been fighting in my shop since the very start – falling objects. I had my personal safety equipment on hooks, and it kept falling down onto my overcrowded desk, tossing other stuff down on the ground or outright destroying more flimsy pieces.

Enter the Safety Board. It is easy to make – from scrap – and easy to customize – for example for additional items for guests or rarely used pieces like a face shield in my case.

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